Proper diagnosis is crucial for glaucoma treatment

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Proper diagnosis is crucial for glaucoma treatment

| Jul 13, 2020 | Medical Malpractice |

Glaucoma is one of the most well-known eye conditions. In glaucoma, pressure builds up in the eye. Doctors in Texas are only too aware that glaucoma can lead to a loss of eyesight if it’s improperly diagnosed and treated. One of the most common terms in discussing glaucoma is “angle.” There are two major types of angle-closure glaucoma: acute and chronic. An important risk factor for both is a so-called narrow angle.

The angle in question is found between the outer edge of the cornea and the iris. In people who show this characteristic, the channels that aqueous fluid flows through are much smaller. They’re more susceptible to a build-up of pressure. There are different ways to evaluate and measure the relevant angle in the eye.

The first is with the Van Herick method, which can be administered quickly during an office visit. However, there are some criticisms that it’s not accurate enough. One alternative to the Van Herick method is gonioscopy. In some glaucoma-centered practices, doctors will perform this test on each patient. There’s an argument that it should be used for more eye patients, though. Even where no symptoms are evident, it can be a good idea to get a more accurate measure of the eye’s angle.

For many doctors, the Van Herick method is not exact enough at establishing the angle. Errors in this measurement can cause errors during laser procedures down the road. That means that the use of the Van Herick angle test can be an issue in medical malpractice cases. Doctors have at least five widely accepted ways to test for glaucoma. There’s no reason patients should settle for one potentially inaccurate one. Glaucoma is currently the leading cause of permanent blindness. It’s important that diagnostic measurements for this disease are performed carefully.